Spice Up Your Inbox. Subscribe Today.

enter your email address:







Apr
29
2013

Ever want in on a big idea early?

Like who was the damn genius that came up with the sliding doors on minivans? Or washable markers. Or DVRs.

Well, my dad is pretty sure he’s got the next big thing. You are going to need a visual.

I was recently at his apartment and I noticed this…

clothing bins 2

So I asked him, “Why exactly do you keep your clothes in garbage pails?”

But he insists they are not garbage pails at all. According to my dad, they are post-modern clothes containers or a mobile closet.

He came up with this brilliant clothing storage system while strolling through IKEA. He was about to buy a boring old dresser when he came upon and these are his words… “stacks of beautiful containers complete with handy-dandy handles.” No assembly required!

If you have ever tried to put together anything from IKEA or a Barbie Dream Townhouse for that matter, you can appreciate the desperate desire to avoid such a situation. And my dad had stumbled upon the perfect alternative to building a dresser.

Now every clothing item has its own place and when it comes time to move, he can just pick up his garbage pails, I mean, his mobile closet, and he’s out the door. (This must be a very popular storage system for fugitives.)

So there you go. I’m sure this idea will be sweeping the nation soon. Get in early!

Now as to why my dad only buys things in black or navy….

clothing bins 1

I still haven’t quite figured that out.

mama bird diaries

Ever heard of a baby with no diapers? It’s called elimination communication and moms are really doing it. Read it about here on Lifetime Moms.


15 Responses to the next genius invention

  • Sara says:

    Oh I totally get the black and navy clothes….I assume its so they match? (That’s why I do it). Still don’t get the garbage pails tho……

    Dads are so cute aren’t they??!!

  • chris says:

    I am ashamed to admit I have let my teenage son use a laundry basket system. He has a clean one and a dirty one. I spent years trying to get him to put his clothes away and then I decided it was a battle that I no longer wanted to fight. Hopefully his future wife, whomever that will be, can teach him and I will accept that she will be talking about what a terrible mother I was.

  • MommyTime says:

    Here’s the thing: I collect, sort, wash, dry, fold, sort again, and distribute back to rooms in tidy stacks. It’s not my responsibility what happens with the clothes after that. If you can’t be bothered to put the clothes in the dresser, can’t tell your dirty pile from your clean pile, can’t find what you want to wear because you ignore the tidy stacks until they become a giant jumble? Not. My. Problem. So I think a solution like this might be a good one. It wouldn’t work for girls who like to wear dresses without wrinkles — but for boys’ athletic pants and other detritus? Genius. I’m with Marinka on this one.

  • Tommy-Tom says:

    Perfect. The buzz is building. And, BTW, a green stripe is clearly visible on the pictured pants in closet #3. Variety is the spice of life and all that.

  • nancywalton says:

    I believe your dad is on to something there! There seems to be a method to his madness right down to the colors of clothing he chooses, even if you haven’t quite figured it out yet. I’m more concerned about your last paragraph, the comment about babies without diapers. Too much potential for something to go very very wrong there, me thinks. Are you planning in trying this with your new baby?

  • Jeneen says:

    OMG, I love it! I hate folding, I hang all my clothes up…only clothes that don’t need to be folded can go in my dresser so this would be a great alternative, I wouldn’t even need to open or close drawers!!! πŸ™‚

  • Genius idea! Pity they aren’t at hip height… although… all that bending could be considered excercise.
    We use Kitty Litter Trays as in-trays – they are the perfect size to fit the folders that we use in our hanging files without crumpling the edges. And they are a lot studier than regular in-trays.


kelcey kintner


Search


Archives