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Nov
06
2007

If you have children, you really should feed them. Or else they will get very cranky. And despite my desperate hope each week that food will magically appear in my fridge and in my cabinets, it has yet to happen. So that means a weekly run to the grocery store.

3 year-old Dylan and 10 month-old Summer enjoy a trip to the market. But their enthusiasm seems to fade before we are even out of the produce department. Dylan likes to fill up and push one of those mini kid shopping carts but then she decides it’s too heavy half way through our list and abandons it in the middle of aisle 4. That, of course, can leave me trying to maneuver Summer in the stroller and the little grocery cart – all while keeping track of Dylan who is now meandering through the aisles. So, when possible, the kids only come along when I need just a few things.

Thankfully, my husband Rick does the big weekly food run at Whole Foods on Monday mornings before he heads to work. My responsibility is the grocery list. I type it out and I am pretty specific. These are items from recent lists.

Cooked Chicken – Rick, keep in mind that the chicken Francais in the prepared foods section is a bit fattening so you may not want to get tons of this.

Note: I’m sure Rick appreciated the diet tip.

Whole Wheat Tortillas – If they have the Maria & Ricardo’s brand, get 3. If they are sold out, buy one of any other kind. Just make sure they are whole wheat. If there are no whole wheat, don’t buy any.

Granola – Don’t get Cascadian Farms. I like it but now I’m sick of it. I need something new. Any kind but just make sure the total fat is 3 grams or less per serving.

The last one had my husband in the cereal aisle for a good long time. He scans rows and rows of granola boxes – some with berries, some with nuts, some with honey, some with oats, some with a combination of berries, nuts, honey and oats… and he starts to panic. But he pulls it together, comparing total fat per serving on a variety of boxes and victoriously chooses a low fat granola. Most weeks, he even gets to work on time.

The food gets delivered in these reusable bags so I feel all eco-proud on Mondays. Dylan and Summer are delighted to “help” me unpack the groceries. In order to minimize my frustration, I try to consider this an afternoon kid’s activity rather than a task that actually needs to be completed. It kind of goes like this. I put the chicken in the fridge. Summer pulls two yogurts out of the fridge. I put the two yogurts back in. Summer grabs the string cheese and the hummus. But finally, it all gets put away… at least somewhere. Note to anal organized self: I can rearrange the food and line up the yogurt containers after the girls are in bed.

So our fridge is stocked… at least for a few days.


3 Responses to the list

  • Kimberly says:

    i am sorry, but i can't pass up a comment on this one… not just because he is my brother.. but WOW! if i ever gave steve a shopping list with dietary advice and fat gram restrictions, you could bet i'd be doing the shopping from there on out! on the other hand, good for you for being so specific.. i always find myself disappointed when i don't do the actual shopping.

  • izzy's mama says:

    That granola scene is amusing..My husband can barely pick up a container of milk let alone select the proper granola! I swear that once I sent him out for 2 half gallons of milk and he came back with two that were BOTH leaking!!! Guess who had to return them..

  • Quinn says:

    Erik would so love this story Kelcey. Not only does he make the list, but he then reads the Super Saver outloud so I won't miss anything on sale. Sometimes, I get very confused as to whether we actually need the chicken leg family pack or if $1.99/lb for chicken is just a good deal. While the whole thing is a little exhausting, I'll still keep shopping because Erik just doesn't get the same pleasure from my reusable bags.


kelcey kintner


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