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Oct
10
2018

This post is sponsored by the Center for Parent and Teen Communication.  All opinions are my own. 

Parenting a teenager is kind of like trying to put together a piece of Ikea furniture. You know lots of people have accomplished it but you find yourself sitting on the floor, surrounded by chaos and probably weeping. 

Yes, there is going to be crying. Yes, it’s more challenging than you thought. But by the end you have raised a confident, successful adult (or you have a slightly wobbly dresser). Either way, success!

The Center for Parent and Teen Communication is a great resource when you’re pretty positive you have no idea what your doing. 

Like this article from Dr. Ken Ginsburg.  He writes about an exercise where you remember the things you loved about your child during their younger years and you see how those same attributes are still present in the teen years.  As Ginsburg says, “They are the little boys and girls you have always loved, now growing into young men and women. The path may occasionally be bumpy, but they remain as you have known them to be.” 

Ginsburg seems smart so I try it…

THEN: My daughter Dylan at 4.

I signed my 4 year-old daughter up for a painting class. She loves anything artsy so I know she will love it. Big pieces of paper are placed before each child along with paints and brushes. But my creative daughter sees no need for brushes. She wants to use her fingers and her hands. She refuses to use the brushes. The teacher insists. It becomes a stand off between the art teacher and my child. We finally leave and drop out of the class. We find another one where you can get messy and create with abandon.  I can’t help but be proud. No one is telling my daughter how to be an artist. 

NOW: Dylan at 14. 

She is brave and strong. She is the first to raise her hand in class and strongly argue her opinion. She know her true compass and she follows it. She is passionate about the rights of kids. She believes young people need to speak up and be heard. She tells me that one day she will be a Supreme Court Justice or a Pediatric Surgeon. Or maybe both. Why would she ever limit herself? She still loves art and being messy. Life is too short to spend one’s life cleaning instead of creating. 

Your turn: Want to try it with your teen? What are some warm memories from when your child was five or under? What awesome thing is your teen doing now? And take a look at this video too. 

[VIDEO]


3 Responses to The Closest Thing You’ll Find to a Parenting Manual for the Teen Years.

  • Eva says:

    I am so happy I got the chance to read this. I am raising my daughters the same way, I quit my job because it was stressful for all of us when it was time to be dropped off at daycare to got to work. I’m a stay at home mom and I can tell you that I have heard oy negative comments left and right. Sometimes I feel depressed because I doubt myself at times. I want my kids to be stronger like yours. I believe kids need a lot of love and nurturing at a very young age specially if they don’t communicate properly. Like your daughter I also believe kids don’t have a voice, a saying in anything. We forget as adults that they are the future not us.

  • Eva says:

    I am so happy I got the chance to read this. I am raising my daughters the same way, I quit my job because it was stressful for all of us when it was time to be dropped off at daycare to got to work. I’m a stay at home mom and I can tell you that I have heard only negative comments left and right. Sometimes I feel depressed because I doubt myself at times. I want my kids to be strong like yours. I believe kids need a lot of love and nurturing at a very young age specially if they don’t communicate properly. Like your daughter I also believe kids don’t have a voice, a saying in anything. We forget as adults that they are the future not us.

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kelcey kintner


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