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A notice came home from Dylan’s school about a multi-cultural celebration. Each family is instructed to prepare a dish that is a reflection of their family’s native country or countries.

And for those stumped by this request (which I immediately am), they go on to give some examples like… sushi from our Japanese friends, lasagna from our Italian families and paella from our Spanish families.

So I immediately reflect on my deep Connecticut heritage but come up with nothing. Although I do remember eating a lot of Chinese take-out and some crockpot meals.

Time to tap the ancestors.

I know I’ve got some English and Irish blood.

Maybe I could bring in a few pints of Guinness?

And I definitely have some Dutch in me because I once dragged a pair of wooden shoes to elementary school in celebration of heritage month.

But fine Netherlands cuisine is not immediately popping into my head so I switch course.

Rick’s Eastern European Jewish heritage!

And we decide to make matzoh ball soup. Because it sounds so much easier than brisket.

And it is!

I mean, buying and heating it is easier.

Then it’s time to transport it to the school which is when I realize, it’s totally stupid to bring soup. I have to use packing tape to keep the lid on. And I carry the pot in a huge box so I don’t burn off my fingers and so I don’t spill soup on my veggie booty/wheat thins covered minivan carpet.

I lug it all there and then I see what a friend brought. I don’t want to give away her identity so I’ll just call her Bemily. Actually, make it Semily. Semily’s dish…

Yes, thankfully she labeled it. So you know it’s pigs in a blanket from the USA. Not to be confused with pigs in a blanket from Argentina.

Of course, they are the BIGGEST hit.

So I’d like to personally thank my daughter Dylan who had two bowls of matzoh ball soup.

You are a good kid.

Oh yeah. Apparently, she loved the hotdogs too.

21 Responses to i’m feeling a little international today

  • Elissa says:

    My daughter had her class holiday party today – and each child was supposed to bring finger foods to share with the class. I was going to make Jell-O jigglers…but then my 7 month old son had a fever yesterday and the day got away from me…and at about 7:00 last night I remembered … and instead I put a few handfuls of animal crackers in a ziploc and put that in her backpack for her to take to school. They are shaped like Winnie the Pooh and friends. I’m sure they must have been a big hit. And since she takes the school bus, I wasn’t even there to see the successful delivery of the animal crackers. Her class is mostly French kids (it’s an international preschool in Hong Kong) so I’m sure they brought canapés of the sort that would put me to shame…but like I said…I wasn’t there…
    And I would be feeling guilty except that 2 weeks ago (during Hanukkah) I went in and taught the class about Hanukkah and lit the menorah and made candy dreidels with them – for which I provided all the supplies (Hershey kisses, marshmallows, pretzel sticks) – and I sent each kid home with a little plastic dreidel and a bag of Hanukkah gelt – so I think my holiday contribution was covered.

  • Meg D says:

    Haha! Brilliant. My son’s school is doing the same thing. Despite my Italian-American husband, I’m pure WASP too so my immediate thought was gin and tonic. I mean, that’s the best contribution we’ve made to the larder, right?

    He’s at a private school so the pesky rules about alcohol on premises are different (ie wine at the back to school meeting) so I’m thinking I may just do it!

  • annie says:

    Love it! We always go with the tried and true french madelines because really, who doesn’t prefer cookies over everything else. Oh, and the french is on my husbands side so HE makes them. That’s my favorite part!

  • magpie says:

    The school I work it is truly multicultural – we get stuff like roti and curried goat. It’s kind of awesome.

    I could use some matzoh ball soup right about now though…

  • Hee Hee…those “bring in exotic dishes” things never work out. The only thing the kids ever eat are the brownies. Or, in your case, the hotdogs. Leave the experimentation for college…

  • Aunt Marcia (Guess Whose?) says:

    SOUP? Come on…worst thing to bring to potluck. Gefilte fish with hot horseradish would have only been worse for the little kids. You’d be a hit with Hummantasch cookies (can’t spell it) or Halvah. You can even buy chocolate covered matzohs in case you don’t know.

  • Honest Mum says:

    Well done you ( despite the spillage) for the making the soup and to Dylan for eating it. Great idea. Those pigs in blankets do NOT look appetising and doesn’t everyone know Jewish chicken soup is the cure for all ailments.

kelcey kintner