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Sep
11
2013

This is the first time since 9/11 that I haven’t lived in New York. And it makes me feel off kilter. My friends in New York don’t talk about 9/11 very often. It’s just a part of a shared history.

I think about friends who suffered deep, life altering losses. I think about images that can never be erased. Twelve years is a long time. But when it comes to loss, it is nothing.

Five years ago, Congress declared 9/11 a National Day of Service and Remembrance.

I will certainly remember. The pain, the chaos, the lost souls. The inability to roll back time – when you desperately want to.

I haven’t quite figured out how to serve. How I can honor this day amongst palm trees, new routines and a world where I don’t quite have my footing yet?

Each year, my older girls (6 and almost 9) learn more about 9-11. This year, they had a lot of questions about the planes, the buildings, the firefighters, all the people who didn’t come home that night.

I can’t bear to tell them everything. I can’t tell them what their daddy witnessed when his news station sent him down to the World Trade Center. Or the innocent faces on those missing person flyers that blanketed the city for weeks and weeks. Or the New York Times Portraits of  Grief that haunt me.

I tell them that very good people died that day. And the days that followed from breathing toxic air at Ground Zero or fighting on foreign battlefields. And they are deeply missed.

And we must honor them and their families.

By being kind and respectful to others.

Praying for the families left behind.

And just taking a moment to be grateful for whatever we have in our lives. Whether it be whining children, dirty dishes or messy houses. Because we are all lucky to be here, in lives that are just too short.


17 Responses to 9/11. 12 years later.

  • Leigh Ann says:

    I visited the Texas State Cemetery the other day doing research for a site I write for, and I came across a 9/11 memorial that I didn’t even know was there. It was so beautiful and difficult to be in the presence of such history. Although I only saw them from the news, the missing persons signs still stick in my mind.

  • Elizabeth Farquhar says:

    Kelsey you often have me lol but today you have moved me to tears. I have visited the memori twice when I have been vacationing from my home in Scotland and it is a tranquil oasis in the heart of busy Manhattan, thank you for the reminder.

  • Judy says:

    The first anniversary of 9/11 I found myself substitute teaching and having to create a memorial lesson off the top of my head as the school was simply not on top of what to do for this date. The next year, on 9/11, I wasn’t called to work as the school district was better organized and all teachers were in their classrooms. So, there I was walking through a nature preserve this second anniversary when I heard bag pipes, in the distance, playing in honor of the 9/11 victims. So perfect, so profound with that wailing sound, I stopped and prayed a long, long prayer and I remembered, then, and will always remember my son-in-law the dental student, but former firefighter, saying as we watched the TV on that tragic day and listened to a beep, beep, beep sound, “Do you know what that sound means?”, said a barely audible Joe. That particular sound means that a firefighter is down…so many, many beeps. We sat in silence for a long time just listening with comprehension being so very hard.

  • Lanie says:

    My heart, thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their loved ones today and everyday.

    Hugging the people in my house a little tighter today. So very thankful for the friends and family I do have in this life. xo

  • MN Mama says:

    Thank you for the wonderful reminder to be thankful for all things…. the good, the bad and the ugly. I am grateful for you my friend!

  • bitsy says:

    Thank you, Kelcey, for remembering all the lives that have been lost because of 9/11, especially those who were sent to war in the following years. Some of them are still there. My nephew served two tours in Afghanistan and, although he did come home, he is not well. Much like those who survived that horrible day, he suffers still and probably always will.

  • Alexandra says:

    Only post I’m sharing today, because I’m going to go dark and go outside and do instead. Hopping around, looking for something to RT and share, and this is the one, because of this right here: ” And we must honor them and their families.

    By being kind and respectful to others.

    Praying for the families left behind.

    And just taking a moment to be grateful for whatever we have in our lives. Whether it be whining children, dirty dishes or messy houses. Because we are all lucky to be here, in lives that are just too short.”

    Thank you.

  • Amanda says:

    It is so hard revealing to inquisitive minds and innocent hearts the magnitude of the loss and hurt that day and those that followed. You bring beauty by remembering.

  • Kerri says:

    I live half way between the Capital of Canada (Ottawa) & the Capital of the Province of Ontario (Toronto) & live 10 minutes from the US border. We live under the main airlines’ flight paths & my husband was in Ottawa for work that day. I had the tv on while playing with the kids when it was interrupted by a live broad-cast. The first plane had hit. I had friends in NY. I have family that is American. I knew that the tower was going to collapse & wanted them to get everyone out..now. Then I watched as the second plane hit. I had night-mares, was feeling for the losses my friends endured. I suddenly ended up with a serious illness & almost died only a few days later. We need to be thankful everyday for what we do have & by doing so we can remember those who no longer have that opportunity.


kelcey kintner


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